Some Articles on Interactive Music Videos

“Hell Is For Interactive Music Video” on Blogeristics

I’m interested in how it mentioned that other than the web, interactive TV utilizing setup-boxs is another option.

“Red or Dead” by Owen Gibson

How to Create an Interactive Music Video by Thomas Baekdal
A list of things that isn’t commonly found in interactive music videos these days.

Labuat’s “Soy tu Aire”

This interactive music video, featuring “Soy tu Aire” by French singer Labuat, is put together by Herraiz Soto & Co.. The music video features a brush stroking running along; the viewer control the brush’s movement and follows its perceptions. The size of the brush varies based on the song’s volume, and occasionally, trickets of visual elements may appear along the path.

Play the music video

Neon Bible from Arcade Fire

The Arcade Fire’s “Neon Bible” is another interesting example where the user can controller the music video’s performance.

Watch (and play) the Music Video

Users can interact with different parts fo the video (for the majority of the time, the vocalist’s hands and head), which reacts differently on different parts of the video.

Guitar Hero Hero by LeetStreet Boys [Online Game]

The LeetStreet Boys (a.k.a. the L33tStr33t Boys) is a fantasy band themed on Anime Otaku culture. Found by Matt Myers and Ryan¬† McCormack, the band made the spotlight with its single music video, “Yuri The Only One”. In many of its songs, music video, and webcomic, references to games are superfluous; for starters, the lead singer sports a Guitar Hero guitar controller for most of the performances. Nathan Soria, who had worked with the band to create animated music videos for them.

The single that’s of interest today, “Guitar Hero Hero”, is a tribute song to the Guitar Hero games as well as an attempt to fuse RPG with music games.¬† This single is also made into an online game that resembles DDR.

Play the game here

Blog post about it

The music video that runs in the background is pre-rendered, and the only visual elements that responds to the player’s performance is the score bar UI, overlayed over the music video. There are 3 different endings based on the player’s performance, but even those may end up becoming disjointed from what happened in the music video.

Vib Ribbon

A game on Playstation, where you control a rabbit character to travel through a stage filled with obsticles. And, as a music game, the obsticles (blocks, holes, loops, etc) are placed based on the music.

Intro and Tutorial

Example of gameplay

King of the Dogs by Iggy Pop

Interactive music video for King of the Dogs by Iggy Pop.

The interactive part in this is that users can chose between 3 main characters, and therefore 3 variations of narratives.

Wiimote and Openframeworks

I went to the openframeworks workshop today, and asked around for using Wiimote with OF. There are lots of response where the OSC library in OF can be used to send Wiimote data.

Glovepie, a scripting language that works with Wiimote, can send OSC output. By theory, if OF listens to the same port as Glovepie sends osc message to, OF can thus do stuff with the Wiimote data.

The problem is, Glovepie crashes when I try to run scripts that sends out OSC data.

I’ve Seen Enough – Interactive Music Video of Cold War Kids

Interactive version of Cold War Kids’ I’ve Seen Enough:

I’ve Seen Enough on MTV

Other than the fact that you can mute/unmute a band member’s performance, the better surprise is that each band member’s performance also comes in 4 different versions as well.

Ride My Star – Interactive Music Video of Julian Perretta

While this is not a game, I found it an interesting example of interactive music video as music promos. devilfish made a Flash animation that utilized the webcam and some computer vision to render a 3D version of the music video. The main interaction takes place with the user holding a “tracking card” in front of the camera, by which the 3D video is rendered.

Julian Perretta’s Interactive Music Promo on Creative Review

Idea Bash – 10/09/2009

So far, I feel like I’m biting too much for myself. Some of the stuff I want to do will involve branching into other areas that requires more research, more exploration, and more possibilities.

I want this thesis to be something I am willing to continue to work on after I get out of Parsons. I also can imagine the sort of stuff I want to do with it. However, there are some more fundemental questions which I have to resolve first, so I’m going to do exactly that: going back to the basics.

So, I want to explore the different elements that constitutes a music rhythm game.

I want to explore how performing an action (pressing a button, moving the joystick, etc) along a rhythm can relate to the sound, visuals, and narrative of the game. I also want to see how that will change the game experience.

Finally, I will want to play around with the concept of remixing these elements, and explore whether it’s possible to reconstruct rhythm games into an interactive music videa or an alternative form of performance piece.

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